Calculating Costs in China

Immersion-Style Classes for Adults

Is it possible to have a basic Mandarin Chinese class that uses very little English? Yes! For whatever reason, no one bats an eye when we do immersion-style classes with the little kids, but when adults hear the class will only be in Chinese, they get nervous! Most of my adult students are interested in traveling to China, or have done some traveling there already. It is actually possible to help students prepare for a trip to China by talking about how much things cost there, all in Chinese!

Introducing Numbers in Chinese

One lesson that works for adult students (delivered almost entirely in Mandarin Chinese) is to talk about the prices of things in China. Usually, the students will already be familiar with the numbers. I like to do a warm-up that involves using chopsticks to move coffee beans around. I give the students one or two minutes (depending on how generous I am feeling :)) to move a small pile of coffee beans from one side of the desk to the other. Then we count together to see who moved the most. In a group of ten students, they will hear me count from one to ten close to ten times. There is no point in having the students struggle over trying to remember the numbers, so I also write them on the board. The added bonus is that some students will realize that they need to practice their chopsticks skills.

picture of person holding a pair of chopsticks
How well can you use these?

 

Guessing Costs

Once we have finished the chopsticks activity, we look at a slideshow of things that people often buy in China. These include a coffee, tea, beer, a bowl of noodles, and bottled water. In Chinese, with translation as needed, I ask the students to guess how much each thing costs in China. As the students make their guesses, I write down the numbers and repeat them in Chinese. This way, the students hear the structure over and over again. After collecting all the guesses, I reveal the correct answer and we see who got the closest.

We stay in Mandarin Chinese throughout the activity, so that the students get plenty of input in that language. If the students make their guesses about prices in English, it is no big deal. They are still active and engaged in the class. They just don’t have the language yet to use it. I simply repeat their guess in Chinese so that the students can hear it.

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Takeaways

The content is interesting to the students because it is useful. Since we look at the costs of coffee, water, food and beer, they can get an idea of how much they would spend on a typical day traveling through China. They can also get an interesting insight into simple economic differences between the US and China. Many students are surprised to learn that a cup of coffee often costs twice as much as lunch!

*With the little kids we talk about pets, transportation, food, etc., but those are all topics that are more kid-friendly

Learn more about classes for adult students here.

More on doing business in China.