What Does it Cost in China?

Immersion-Style Classes for Adults

Is it possible to have a basic Mandarin Chinese class that uses very little English? Yes! For whatever reason, no one bats an eye when we do immersion-style classes with the little kids, but when adults hear the class will only be in Chinese, they get nervous! Most of my adult students are interested in traveling to China, or have done some traveling there already. It is actually possible to help students prepare for a trip to China by talking about how much things cost there, all in Chinese!

Introducing Numbers in Chinese

One lesson that works for adult students (delivered almost entirely in Mandarin Chinese) is to talk about the prices of things in China. Usually, the students will already be familiar with the numbers. I like to do a warm-up that involves using chopsticks to move coffee beans around. I give the students one or two minutes (depending on how generous I am feeling :)) to move a small pile of coffee beans from one side of the desk to the other. Then we count together to see who moved the most. In a group of ten students, they will hear me count from one to ten close to ten times. There is no point in having the students struggle over trying to remember the numbers, so I also write them on the board. The added bonus is that some students will realize that they need to practice their chopsticks skills.

picture of person holding a pair of chopsticks
How well can you use these?

 

Guessing Costs

Once we have finished the chopsticks activity, we look at a slideshow of things that people often buy in China. These include a coffee, tea, beer, a bowl of noodles, and bottled water. In Chinese, with translation as needed, I ask the students to guess how much each thing costs in China. As the students make their guesses, I write down the numbers and repeat them in Chinese. This way, the students hear the structure over and over again. After collecting all the guesses, I reveal the correct answer and we see who got the closest.

We stay in Mandarin Chinese throughout the activity, so that the students get plenty of input in that language. If the students make their guesses about prices in English, it is no big deal. They are still active and engaged in the class. They just don’t have the language yet to use it. I simply repeat their guess in Chinese so that the students can hear it.

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Takeaways

The content is interesting to the students because it is useful. Since we look at the costs of coffee, water, food and beer, they can get an idea of how much they would spend on a typical day traveling through China. They can also get an interesting insight into simple economic differences between the US and China. Many students are surprised to learn that a cup of coffee often costs twice as much as lunch!

*With the little kids we talk about pets, transportation, food, etc., but those are all topics that are more kid-friendly

Learn more about classes for adult students here.

More on doing business in China.

Task: How Well Do you Know African Animals?

Why Tasks?

Tasks are a great tool for the language learning classroom. A task is different from an activity in that we are actually doing something that has a purpose other than just using the language. More posts about tasks in Chinese language class are here and here. This week I have been doing different versions of a task about African animals with my lower elementary students.

Reading as Task Warm Up

First, we look at the book Draw! by Raul Colon. It is a wordless picture book, so the teacher can talk as much or as little about the pictures as she likes. It is the story of a boy who travels to Africa through his drawings. The book features an elephant, giraffes, gorillas, monkeys and a rhino. While we read the book, I like to talk about what the animals are doing, and what they are eating. It could also work to talk about how they look and their different body parts.

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Completing the Task

The next step after the book is the quiz, “Is this Animal from Africa?” I have pictures of different animals on a Powerpoint presentation. We click through about ten different animals and write down the students’ guesses about whether the animal is from Africa or not. Some they are get, like knowing the lion is from Africa and the polar bear isn’t. There are a few that stump the kids, though. So far, no one has know that there are penguins from Africa!

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“Rules” For Learning to Speak Mandarin

Some folks love rules, so here they are. Below are three rules for learning to speak Mandarin Chinese.

Rule #1: Don’t force yourself to talk. The same rule goes for parents of children who are learning Mandarin Chinese. Many students (and parents) believe that students should try to repeat what the teacher says. There really is not any reason to do that. At best, students end up feeling like they are doing something that resembles learning. Having positive feelings about language learning is a good thing, but they don’t directly lead to language acquisition.

It is perfectly normal and expected to go through a “silent stage” in learning a new language. There is also a tremendous amount of variation in how long this silent stage lasts. It depends on both the learner, and also how much input the student gets. Adult students often will try to talk, but young children do not do the same. It could easily be months before a student says anything in Mandarin Chinese.

Rule #2: Speaking in full sentences does not matter. Many students (and parents) have it in their heads that students need to start speaking Mandarin Chinese in complete sentences. Just like forced speech, I think that this comes from the mindset that students need to be doing something that looks like learning. Speaking in a complete sentence is not really necessary, however.

To begin with, that speaking in a complete sentence is not how we talk normally. Sometimes we respond with one word. Sometimes we respond with a rambling run-on sentence of sorts. One thing should be clear from the blog by now. That is, we learn to speak by listening and not by speaking. Since speaking is not something that we learn by doing, there is no need to force speaking in a certain way, e.g. in complete sentences.

Rule #3: Speaking is useful, but probably not in the way that you think it is. Although we learn to speak through listening, speaking can be useful to language learners in a narrow sense. When a learner talks to someone who is not the teacher in Mandarin Chinese, the learner’s speech can help the new person realize that she needs to slow down and use simpler words.

The type of speech that we hear from beginner and intermediate learners (stilted, single words, lots of errors) is a good reminder for native speakers to slow down. Slowing down is often the most useful thing that a native speaker can do to make it easier for a language learner to understand them.

More on learning to speak Chinese:

Are There Four Skills in Language Learning?

Speaking Practice Does Not Help Students Gain Fluency

MovieTalk: Bao (Short Film)

What is MovieTalk?

The short film Bao, recently won an Oscar. Since it is about a Chinese-Canadian family, and is also a really good, cute little movie it is great material for MovieTalk. MovieTalk is a technique for language classrooms. With MovieTalk, a teacher shows the class a short movie with the sound/dialogue turned off. She narrated what is happening the the movie and asks lots of questions along the way. For a 45 or 60 minute class, a 5 minute-long movie is about right. At 7ish minutes, the movie Bao is a little long, but it still works.

still shot from movie Bao, characters go shopping
Mom and Bao buy sweet buns

How Does it Work?

For zero-beginner students, the teacher can just narrate what is happening in the movie. The students will be able to understand what is happening because they will be able to match what the teacher says to the images. This is a version of the comprehensible input that students need in order to learn a second language. Most of my students are still beginners, but not zero-beginners. With the movie Bao, I ask basic questions that I know the students can answer. These include: “Who is she? Who is she? Where are they.” For beginner students, it is fine for students to answer in English. As long as they understand the question, we are doing fine.

Why is the Movie Bao Good for MovieTalk?

Using a movie like Bao is also great for the content in Chinese class. Many of my adult students are interested in learning about Chinese culture. With the movie Bao, we can talk about different kinds of Chinese food, the relationships between parents and children and many other things.

still shot from movie Bao, family making baozi together
A teacher can ask the same question four times (who is s/he?) and give students a lot of repetition in target structures.

Final Thoughts

MovieTalk is effective for a couple different reasons. Firstly, it is fun. Since it won the Oscar, I’ve shown Bao to groups of kids, individual students and also to adult students. The film has a wide appeal. This is helpful because students really do learn more when they are having fun. Stressed out and anxious students do not learn as much as students who are relaxed and happy. The other reason it works is because the students can hear the target language at a slower than normal pace (which is whatever the teacher is saying) accompanied by strong contextual support (the movie). It is that comprehension that is important. Students need this kind of comprehensible input to learn a language. MovieTalk is fun technique to use for them to get it.

still shot from movie Bao, baby baozi
Who wouldn’t want to watch a movie about this lil guy?

 

 

What Are You Afraid of? : A Language-learning Task

Activities Vs Tasks

In language learning, tasks are activities that have a purpose other than just trying to learn the language itself. In an activity, students are just using the language without a real purpose. For example, asking everyone in the class what their favorite food is. This is just an activity, not a task, because no one really cares what the answers are at the end. Additionally, if students feel pressured to come up with a food in the target language, they might not even give an honest answer. Instead, a task might include taking a survey of all the students in the class to ask what their favorite food is, and then compare the answers to an article that shows the most popular food in every state. The students can find out if they are representative or not of the people in their state.

Which Tasks Work With Kids?

The key to doing tasks with kids is to make sure that the topic is something interesting to them and something relevant to their lives. For example, a task about pets is usually a hit because kids like animals. On the other hand, I wouldn’t design a task around which movies won Oscars in 1999 because my group of 8 year olds just won’t care. One task that I have done with my kids is about fears and what they are afraid of.

photo of spider in web
Are you afraid of spiders?

A Task about Fears

Language learning is all about getting that comprehensible input. We need to talk to students using the language in a way they can understand. I start this task by establishing the meaning of the phrases “I am afraid of XX” and “I am not afraid of XX.” Then, I read the story I Used to Be Afraid in Chinese (pictured below). Then, we make a chart of the things that the character in the book says that she is afraid of and compare if the kids in the class are afraid of the same things. To extend this task, we can compare what we think are the most common fears in the class to the most common fears of Americans in general.

photo of book cover "I Used to Be Afraid" (Chinese version)
Cover of “I Used to Be Afraid” in Chinese

The distinguishing feature of tasks is that we are trying to do something other than just use the language in class. We can make sentences about what our fears are all day long, but there is nothing really meaningful there. Tasks work for language learning because they are about something other than the language itself. Language learning happens on the subconscious level while kids busy doing something else.